There’s too much needless hatred in the world. I’m not just talking about the aggressive, vocal, physical hatred, even the passive counterpart that simmers within us needlessly. I write this in the wake of humanity’s notorious history of hateful acts but more specifically the few that have made the news of late.

Let’s start with race. What claim do we have over something we didn’t earn? I’m a Brahmin who lives in Colaba. Let’s split that information into two parts: The Brahmin thing, so what, huh? So my ancestors imparted knowledge. They also practiced caste system and withheld the very knowledge God supposedly put them on earth for. The hatred exists till date. It breeds closed mindedness. It makes us incapable of accepting love. We thrust our own simmering hatred upon the children we bred by forcing them into decisions they should’ve made themselves; like marriage.

The Colaba thing. Recently a situation arose where due to legal complications my family that has been living in our once sea facing flat for 50 years may had to evacuate it. While the case is still in court and the threat continues to loom, things have fizzled out or at least so it seems. It’s a dilapidated building and probably will give way in another 10 years (if not sooner) but when the legal battle was at its most heated, I thought that as much as I like living here, I’ve lived here my whole life without really having earned the right to. So what gives me the authority to pass judgment or feel cheated?

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It happens all the time. It happens all over the world. The Eric Garner incident. They’re all just acts of aggressive hatred having culminated from passive hatred that’s been simmering for a while. For all its “under one god” hoopla, America loves to hate. No one’s take on this is more profound than John Stewart’s:

And then this appeared in Wednesday’s Economic Times’ Edit Page:

“In a path-breaking verdict, the Madras High Court intervened in a fight between two factions of the same fan club by saying the idol with whom both the parties are besotted would not want them to fight. To put things in context, the idol in question is God, specifically in the form of the river Goddess Gangai Amman as venerated by many Hindu Tamils. Bring in a property dispute into religion and, as usual, we have something combustible. Which is why the court has decided that one of the two Gangai Amman temples in a Kancheepuram village that was sealed at the behest of one of the squabblers will remain sealed until the two kiss and make up.

“No god demands that people should fight over worshipping him (sic),” noted the priest of the secular temple of the land. As Gangai Amman was absent at the proceedings, it was left to the court to speak for her. Sectarian squabbles between people of the same ‘religion’ can be befuddling for those outside that faith. Feuds and worse involving Shias-Sunnis, Lata fans-Asha fans, Protestants-Catholics, Modi BJP bhakts-Advani BJP bhakts can seem exceedingly odd for the outsider. But as the high court rightly pointed out, whether it is gods or playback singers, deities don’t want their fan base split. Not unless, of course, they have okayed an all-out schism for strategic reasons.”

When do we ask if it is 4 h8ers 2 h8?

 

 

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